‘The 100’ #34 – Bookcase

I made a draft of #34 and then forgot to post it, so here it is, out of sequence. It’s a quickie.

This bookcase was an educational fundraiser from my teaching days, set up here for silent auction. It was created by a colleague, Leigh McKerlich, and me.

I’m posting this in case any of you are looking for a fundraising idea or a simple personal project. It was popular, easy to make, using stencils, and it sold well.

‘The 100′ series was initiated by my 100th Post in April 2012. As text and images are the essence of my blog my intention is to present 100 pieces of textual art from historical and contemporary artists and from my own hand. To view the series to date click on ‘The 100’ in my Category Menu.

‘The 100’ #32 – Altered Books, Part 3 – Sculpted Text and Found Objects

This third and final Altered Book post looks at a few examples of sculpted text and found objects incorporated into the altered book form. (Click on images for larger version).

Credit for the above image: missdeleon213.wikispaces.com

Hundreds of variations of transforming a book into a 3D work of art exist, but most involve cutting into the book in some way and sometimes adding found objects. The following does both. Titled Fear the work is by Karen Hatzigeorgiou and can be found at:  artful-journey.com


Sometimes the artist ‘illustrates’ the narrative of the book in 3D such as in the wondrously detailed Mad Hatters Tea Party below. Art by Su Blackwell from: ullam.typepad.com

Or in this work by Jennifer Khoshbinjenkhoshbin.com

Other altered book artists take a more abstract approach as in this piece by Lucille Moroni, found at jeniegao.blogspot.com

And in this, titled Fate, Far, Fast, Fall, Final, by the great master, Brian Dettmer (see my The 100 series #28 and #31).

Excavated recesses in the book can hold found objects as in, below: Aotearoa from jenpezaro.wordpress.com followed by a work by Frank Turek, from alteredbookart.com

And finally, some altered book artists strike off in new creative directions, as in the circular, nostalgic piece below, by Lisa Kokin, from  dailyartmuse.com

If this series has tempted you to explore more, or to try your hand at Altered Books, you will find a multitude of sites on the web, or you can visit those sites I have credited. This art form is fun, creative and accessible for all.

‘The 100′ series was initiated by my 100th Post in April 2012. As text and images are the essence of my blog my intention is to present 100 pieces of textual art from historical and contemporary artists and from my own hand. To view the series to date click on ‘The 100’ in my Category Menu.

‘The 100’ #31 – Altered Books, Part 2 – Discovered Poetry

Altered Book poetry is ‘discovered’ by eliminating unwanted text on a book’s page and emphasizing the text elements that will compose a poem. The creative elimination and emphasizing process varies from artist to artist. Here are some examples from my collection that I think work well, in imaginative approach, integration with visual elements and poetic form:  Click on images for larger version.

First, a page from the master of this form, British artist, Tom Phillips, from his famous altered book, A Humument. (see my post ‘The 100’ #9 for more details). Credit: humument.com

Next, a clever, neatly done conceptual poem by Will AshfordCredit to: neatloaf.blogspot.com

This is one of my own ‘discovered’ poems:

And this, a visually pleasing poem called “Drops Fall”. Credit to: beginningofajourney.wordpress.com

The next piece is a whimsical, minimalist poem from westofdodge88. Credit to: logolalia.com

And this is a grunge finished found poem by an ex student of mine, Justin. Thank you Justin, wherever you are now.

And finally, an altered book found poem by another famous and brilliant book artist, Brian Dettmer (see my post, ‘The 100′ #28 for more details). His poem is ‘discovered’ by detailed and careful cutting away of unwanted text.

‘The 100′ series was initiated by my 100th Post in April 2012. As text and images are the essence of my blog my intention is to present 100 pieces of textual art from historical and contemporary artists and from my own hand. To view the series to date click on ‘The 100’ in my Category Menu.

‘The 100’ #30 – Altered Books, Part 1…

A very popular contemporary art form that frequently fuses text and art is the altered book. An altered book is a form of mixed-media art that changes a book from its original form into a different form, altering its appearance and/or meaning.

To make an altered book, the artist takes a book (old, new, recycled or multiple) and cuts, tears, glues, burns, folds, paints, adds to, collages, rebinds, creates pop-ups, rubber-stamps, drills, bolts, and/or be-ribbons it. The artist may add pockets and niches to hold tags and ephemera or other three-dimensional objects. Some change the shape of the book, or use multiple books in the creation of the finished piece of art.

Altered books may be as simple as adding a drawing or text to a page, or as complex as creating an intricate book sculpture. Victorian or antique art is frequently used, probably because it is easier to avoid copyright issues. Altered books are shown and sold in art galleries and on-line.

Since exploring Altered Books with my students I have collected hundreds of images of altered book pages and will post a selection of them in three parts. This post is Part 1 -The flat page with art and text.  Part 2 will look at Altered Book poetry; and Part 3: The sculpted book and found objects.

More Altered Book Images:  (All Credits at bottom of page).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credits from top to bottom:  Altered Book information – Wikipedia.  Picture 1 – susanlenz.com / Picture 2 – sperkins.wordpress.com / Picture 3 – by Terry Owen: autumnwindstudios.com / Picture 4 – by Shauna Palmer: art-e-zine.co.uk / Picture 5 – by darkRRab: pavoninestudios.com / Picture 6 – by Helga: art-e-zine.co.uk / Picture 7 – ingriddijkers.com / Picture 8 – stempelchaotin.wordpress.com

‘The 100′ series was initiated by my 100th Post in April 2012. As text and images are the essence of my blog my intention is to present 100 pieces of textual art from historical and contemporary artists and from my own hand. To view the series to date click on ‘The 100’ in my Category Menu.

‘The 100’ #29 – Ken Lum

Ken Lum (born 1956) is a Canadian artist of Chinese heritage who lives and works in Vancouver. Working in a number of media including painting, sculpture and photography, his art is conceptually oriented, and is generally concerned with issues of identity in relation to language and portraiture.

Ken Lum has exhibited his work widely throughout Canada, the United States, Europe and Asia. He is known best for ironic photo-text works that create humorous tensions between language and image, fiction, reality and stereotype. Lum has also produced public art commissions in Vancouver, Vienna, Austria, and St. Moritz, Switzerland.

Lum has also led a distinguished career as an educator, teaching at the University of British Columbia, where he was Head of the Graduate Program in Studio Art from 2000 to 2006 and the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, among other educational institutions.  Lum was made a Guggenheim Fellow in 1999 and awarded a Killam Award for Outstanding Research in 1998 and the Hnatyshyn Foundation Visual Arts Award in 2007.

Lum’s interest in art extends back to his youth, working as an illustrator for the Vancouver Public Library. Later he worked for the Province of British Columbia’s Ministry of the Environment in the area of pestology and as an illustrator of flora and fauna. At Simon Fraser University, while a science student Lum enrolled in a contemporary art class led by Canadian artist Jeff Wall.  Later he was a student of  Ian Wallace.

This work (left) questions how we view and accept written text that appears to be foreign to our native language.


Lum is often cited as a member of the informally named Vancouver School of artists, along with Wall, Wallace, Stan Douglas, Rodney Graham and Roy Arden.

Lum often works with the visual ambiguity of mirrors and how they reflect our image of ourselves. His Mirror Maze combines our feelings of being lost in our own reflections with text etched into the glass that emphasizes those feelings.

As a resident of East Vancouver and a non- Christian, I was not the only person to question this (left) public work by Ken Lum. However, I didn’t grow-up here so was oblivious to the history behind the ‘Cross’. The symbolic power of the Latin cross evokes strong reaction and it is hard to separate it from the power of the Christian church.

It is a large scale version of a street image that has circulated in East Vancouver for decades – a crossword of ‘Van East’ using the common ‘A’. The entire work is outlined with white LED lights. It has multiple associations including religion and irreverence and is an assertion of east-side identity.

Ken Lum explains:

“[The crossword] signifies the identity of those living in the eastern part of the city and is often accompanied with the word “rules”. [This] is ironic, as traditionally those in the west of the city have held the economic and political power, though the real estate boom more recently has rendered the boundary between east and west more fluid. The piece monumentalizes a rearguard gesture of defiance, protest, and assertion of identity.”

Lum uses text as understated irony, dark humour and provocation. He wants us to consider and question the juxtaposition of his words and images.

 

 

 

 

 

More works by Ken Lum:

I propose the following questions to you:

Is the artist laughing at or with?

Is he laughing at all?

How does the text alter how you view the images?

What is Lum’s intent?

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do you think?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘The 100′ series was initiated by my 100th Post in April 2012. As text and images are the essence of my blog my intention is to present 100 pieces of textual art from historical and contemporary artists and from my own hand. To view the series to date click on ‘The 100’ in my Category Menu.

‘The 100’ #28 – Brian Dettmer

Brian Dettmer, (born 1974) is an American ‘Altered Book’ artist of mind-bending genius. He is noted for his alteration of old books, maps, record albums, and cassette tapes—to create new, transformed works of visual fine art.

Dettmer seals and cuts into the books, exposing selected images and text to create intricate three-dimensional works that reveal new or alternative interpretations.

In college, Dettmer focused primarily on painting. When he began to work in a sign shop, his work began to explore the relationship between text, images, language, and codes, including paintings based on braille, Morse Code, and American Sign Language.

In recent years, Dettmer has augmented his artistic process by folding, bending, rolling, or stacking one or more books before sealing and cutting them or, in some instances, sanding them to create a variety of forms.

Dettmer talks about his creative Process:
“In this work I begin with an existing book and seal its edges, creating an enclosed vessel full of unearthed potential. I cut into the surface of the book and dissect through it from the front. I work with knives, tweezers and surgical tools to carve one page at a time, exposing each layer while cutting around ideas and images of interest. Nothing inside the books is relocated or implanted, only removed. Images and ideas are revealed to expose alternate histories and memories. My work is a collaboration with the existing material and its past creators and the completed pieces expose new relationships of the book’s internal elements exactly where they have been since their original conception.”

 

 

 

 

 

More works by Brian Dettmer:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘The 100′ series was initiated by my 100th Post in April 2012. As text and images are the essence of my blog my intention is to present 100 pieces of textual art from historical and contemporary artists and from my own hand. To view the series to date click on ‘The 100’ in my Category Menu.



‘The 100’ #27 – Bookworm…

Bookworm… – by clinock. 10″ x 12.5″. Acrylic, photocopies, Letraset; on paper.

“A moth, I thought, munching a word.
How marvelously weird! a worm
Digesting a man’s sayings —
A sneak thief nibbling in the shadows
At the shape of a poet’s thunderous phrases —
How unutterably strange!
And the pilfering parasite none the wiser
For the words he has swallowed.”

The Bookworm.   (Anonymous old English poem).

‘The 100′ series was initiated by my 100th Post in April 2012. As text and images are the essence of my blog my intention is to present 100 pieces of textual art from historical and contemporary artists and from my own hand. To view the series to date click on ‘The 100’ in my Category Menu.