acts of art 16 ~ Liz Magor

Studio Envy. I confess to it, and yet I have a perfectly viable creative space in my one bedroom condo. I can make most of what I like to make here in my living / working room, except the big things. And yet…

Over the years I’ve visited a lot of artist studios and haven’t needed a therapist to know why Studio Envy persists in my deepest caves, ready to rise like an H.P. Lovecraft entity whenever I enter another light filled, white walled, multi shelved, cathedral spaced studio.

It’s precisely because it’s not a ‘living room’, multi tasked studio. It’s simply there to serve as a working space. A rare and beautiful thing this huge volume of air and light, filled with art and the meditative focus of the artist. It can be felt as almost holy…

But let’s not forget it’s also real estate. Here in Vancouver, BC. J.Q. Public is considered blessed by the gods if he/she can find any decent living space at an affordable rent. And then, in addition, to be able to rent a studio!!! Almost inconceivable, unless you are very successful in your chosen field, or very rich.

folded message

Most art studio situations I know of in this city are shared by groups of artists, some of whom have recognized plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose, and have gone with it and called themselves ‘Collectives’ and have even published manifestos.

Liz Magor is a successful Canadian artist and I admire her in every way. She was a mentor at U. Vic. when I was working through a B.F.A. degree. It is impossible to think of masters like her operating without a studio. But what about the rest of us? Ms. Magor believes “Everyone Should Have a Studio”. I agree metaphorically, but realistically, a snowball’s chance in hell…

What do you think about art studios? Do they contribute to the separation of the visual artist from the public? Are they an ivory tower, elitist concept when so many millions are homeless or are they a needed and necessary space for making art?

Do you have a studio? Celebrate it with us on Art Rat Cafe – send pics and tell us how you came by it and what it means to you. Or, if you dream of having a studio of your own, tell us why.

magic-forest

Above two photos from my own workspace.

http://www.johnclinockart.com                 Portfolio Site

http://www.instagram.com/johnclinock/          Instagram

 

 

 

acts of art 13 -Marina Abramovic

 

 

for all who have loved deeply

for all who have said goodbye

because there was no other way

for the grace and courage of those

who can look into anothers eyes

feel the pain and loneliness

tearing the heart

and not turn away

 

I couldn’t decide which to use. Both bring tears every time I watch. Both evoke emotions I have no name for.

 

acts of art 11 – Ira Glass

It was only last year one of my sons turned me on to Ira Glass and This American Life on PBS.  When I tell this to people they politely ask which rock I’ve been living under.

Since then I’ve been addicted to the Ira Glass PBS podcasts so imagine my delight when I discovered this video.

If you are not a writer you can exchange his word “story” for whichever acts of art you call home. I believe that everything he shares in this video can be applied to everyone’s creative process.

It’s fast and true for me, how about you?

Solstice Dance

solstice dance 2
Through this
our longest night

 

the beasts of the earth

and beneath the earth

return the sun

to the queen of light

 

and all the hands

of the promise of spring

join the dance

 

 

Art and poetry by Clinock.

Art: Solstice Dance. 8 x 8 in. ( 20 x 20 cm). Mixed media in cradled panel.

 

 

acts of art 7 ~ Happy Little Clouds

“I believe, I believe everyday is a good day when you paint.

I believe, I believe It’ll bring a lot of good thoughts to your heart.”

 

This Remix honours Robert Norman Ross (October 29, 1942 – July 4, 1995.) R.I.P.

We made fun of you Bob but with love in our hearts. Your T.V. presentations were always so delightfully weird and I confess I can’t stand your painting style. But I also have to accept that you charmed thousands into picking up a brush to try their hand at painting and who can say how far those ripples spread? Who can say how many you inspired to discover paint, explore and expand their creative limitations.

You mostly taught process through  your own inimitable technique, how to re-present one particular version of the real. However, at the same time, you also brought a philosophy of joy into the act of art that spoke to so many who needed to hear what you had to offer.

Thank you Bob.

P.S. ~ I invite you to visit my latest art at my portfolio site:  http://www.johnclinockart.com

 

 

 

acts of art 6 ~ Gina Stepaniuk

 

I love this video, how Gina’s words and art process are woven together so brilliantly.

I hear what she is sharing about the creative process and I connect on all levels with all  senses. So much of this is universal.

What Gina says echoes my own experience. How about you?