acts of art 7 ~ Happy Little Clouds

“I believe, I believe everyday is a good day when you paint.

I believe, I believe It’ll bring a lot of good thoughts to your heart.”

 

This Remix honours Robert Norman Ross (October 29, 1942 – July 4, 1995.) R.I.P.

We made fun of you Bob but with love in our hearts. Your T.V. presentations were always so delightfully weird and I confess I can’t stand your painting style. But I also have to accept that you charmed thousands into picking up a brush to try their hand at painting and who can say how far those ripples spread? Who can say how many you inspired to discover paint, explore and expand their creative limitations.

You mostly taught process through  your own inimitable technique, how to re-present one particular version of the real. However, at the same time, you also brought a philosophy of joy into the act of art that spoke to so many who needed to hear what you had to offer.

Thank you Bob.

P.S. ~ I invite you to visit my latest art at my portfolio site:  http://www.johnclinockart.com

 

 

 

acts of art 6 ~ Gina Stepaniuk

 

I love this video, how Gina’s words and art process are woven together so brilliantly.

I hear what she is sharing about the creative process and I connect on all levels with all  senses. So much of this is universal.

What Gina says echoes my own experience. How about you?

acts of art 2 – David Lynch

 

“If you don’t enjoy the doing, then do something else”

food for thought / Jackson Pollock

“When I’m painting, I’m not aware of what I’m doing. It’s only after a get acquainted period that I see what I’ve been about. I’ve no fears about making changes for the painting has a life of its own”.

August 1953:  Portrait of American Abstract Expressionist painter Jackson Pollock (1912 - 1956) at his studio in East Hampton, New York.   (Photo  CREDIT!!!!!!----Tony Vaccaro/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Jackson Pollock. 1912-1956

number-5pollock_1_1949

Image property of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY.

Credits:

Video thanks to YouTube.

Photo thanks to Tony Vaccaro/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

1st painting: Number 5. by Jackson Pollock. 1948. 4×8′. Oil on fiberboard.

2nd. Number 1. by Jackson Pollock. 1949. 5’3″x8’6″. Enamel and aluminum paint on canvas.

3rd. Convergence. by Jackson Pollock. 1952. 93.5″x155″. Oil on canvas.

 

 

 

 

 

food for thought / Richard Diebenkorn

“… putting down what I felt in terms of some overall image at the moment today, and perhaps being terribly disappointed with it tomorrow… trying to make it better and then despairing and destroying partially or wholly… getting back into it and just kind of frantically trying to pull something into this rectangle that made sense to me…”

(Richard Diebenkorn. 1922-1993. American)

Richard_Diebenkorn

Cityscape_I_360

 

Richard_Diebenkorn's_painting_'Ocean_Park_No.129'

 

Richard_Diebenkorn's_painting_'Ocean_Park_No._67'

 

Credits: All images thanks to Wikipedia.

Photo of Diebenkorn, 1986.

Cityscape 1. 1963. oil on canvas. 60×50″.

Ocean Park No.129. oil on canvas. 1984.

Ocean Park No.67. oil on canvas. 1973. 100×80″.

food for thought / francis bacon

“In my case all painting… is an accident. I foresee it and yet I hardly ever carry it out as I foresee it. It transforms itself by the actual paint. I don’t in fact know very often what the paint will do, and it does many things which are very much better than I could make it do”. (Francis Bacon. 1909 – 1992) Francis_Bacon_(artist)

Study_after_Velazquez's_Portrait_of_Pope_Innocent_XStudy_for_the_Head_of_George_Dyer

Three_Studies_for_the_Portrait_of_Henrietta_Moraes

Photo portrait of Francis Bacon. Photographed in late 1980s. credit Wikipedia.com.

Study after Velazquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X. Francis Bacon. 1953. Oil on canvas. 60×46″ (152×117 cm).

Study for the head of George Dyer. Francis Bacon. 1967. Oil on canvas. 14×12″ (35.5×30.5 cm).

Three Studies for the Portrait of Henrietta Moraes. Francis Bacon. 1963. Oil on canvas. Triptych.