acts of art 1 – Alfredo Gisholt

22Untitled22-2016-mixed-media-on-paper-6022-x-6522-720x637

To build on my previous post, about creative process:

…Painter, song writer, potter,

dancer, musician, actor.

What is this mysterious energy

entertaining us all?

Food for thought…

I don’t want to be academic, didactic or woo-woo. I confess I am smitten, fascinated, enchanted by the Muse, ( I can’t think of a better name for this energy we ride when we create). I want to share the words, thoughts, art and ideas of artists about their own creative processes.

I welcome your thoughts, art and ideas about your own process.

I begin with Alfredo Gisholt because he is Mexican and Mexico is much on my mind. I saw his paintings in Mexico many years ago and they changed me. Also the serious rains have come to Vancouver and bring thoughts of all the shimmering mirages waiting in the south.

gisholt picAlfredo Gisholt was born in Mexico City on May 5, 1971.

22Canto-II22-2017-oil-on-canvas-7222-x-8422-720x612

Of his work, Gisholt writes:

” I am just trying to paint a picture, a marvelous large picture. I use simple tools and I have no words.”

“I have no set ways to make things. I draw, paint and make prints and it fills my days in the studio. I do not see them as isolated activities and they all are part of one another. There is an immediacy in drawing that I really respond to. It always challenges the paintings or the paint. I love paint and I see it as a great building material.”

“What I am after is to make something that is animated – as in ‘animas’ or with a soul. I paint and touch the paintings until that happens. Sometimes it is quick and through simple means and other times it takes a long time. I think about the difference between images and paintings – as in fiction and fact. The challenge for my paintings is to become fact – for these imagined constructions to feel as real as a mountain.”

22Landscape22-2018-oil-on-panel-822-x-1022-720x574

All art in this post by Alfredo Gisholt:

1. Untitled, 2016. Mixed media on paper. 60 x 65 inches / 152 x 165 cm.

2. Canto 11, 2017. Oil on canvas. 72 x 84 inches / 183 x 213 cm.

3. Landscape, 2018. Oil on panel. 8 x 10 inches / 20 x 25 cm.

https://www.alfredogisholt.com

the complexities of silence

img_20180926_160516794

 

It was a period of silent contemplation.

Away from previous distractions and illusions.

It was an adventure into other realities

and a questioning about things like this.

 

I return to things like this

and I’ve been thinking again

about creative process, how and

why do we do what we do?

 

Painter, song writer, potter,

dancer, musician, actor.

What is this mysterious energy

entertaining us all?

 

Enter this beyond I know

so very well, the back of my hands,

the inside of eyelids, thighs,

mapping you to my home.

 

And the very bones of me,

and the meat, absent of me,

and the soul of every move I make,

and the complexities of silence.

 

art and poetry by Clinock

 

img_20180926_160516794

 

I had been thinking about underneath

the complexities of silence

and how much deeper it can go

before we are only the dance?

 

 

Art – The Complexities of Silence – 16 x 20 – Mixed media

 

food for thought / Jackson Pollock

“When I’m painting, I’m not aware of what I’m doing. It’s only after a get acquainted period that I see what I’ve been about. I’ve no fears about making changes for the painting has a life of its own”.

August 1953:  Portrait of American Abstract Expressionist painter Jackson Pollock (1912 - 1956) at his studio in East Hampton, New York.   (Photo  CREDIT!!!!!!----Tony Vaccaro/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Jackson Pollock. 1912-1956

number-5pollock_1_1949

Image property of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY.

Credits:

Video thanks to YouTube.

Photo thanks to Tony Vaccaro/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

1st painting: Number 5. by Jackson Pollock. 1948. 4×8′. Oil on fiberboard.

2nd. Number 1. by Jackson Pollock. 1949. 5’3″x8’6″. Enamel and aluminum paint on canvas.

3rd. Convergence. by Jackson Pollock. 1952. 93.5″x155″. Oil on canvas.

 

 

 

 

 

food for thought / Richard Diebenkorn

“… putting down what I felt in terms of some overall image at the moment today, and perhaps being terribly disappointed with it tomorrow… trying to make it better and then despairing and destroying partially or wholly… getting back into it and just kind of frantically trying to pull something into this rectangle that made sense to me…”

(Richard Diebenkorn. 1922-1993. American)

Richard_Diebenkorn

Cityscape_I_360

 

Richard_Diebenkorn's_painting_'Ocean_Park_No.129'

 

Richard_Diebenkorn's_painting_'Ocean_Park_No._67'

 

Credits: All images thanks to Wikipedia.

Photo of Diebenkorn, 1986.

Cityscape 1. 1963. oil on canvas. 60×50″.

Ocean Park No.129. oil on canvas. 1984.

Ocean Park No.67. oil on canvas. 1973. 100×80″.

food for thought / francis bacon

“In my case all painting… is an accident. I foresee it and yet I hardly ever carry it out as I foresee it. It transforms itself by the actual paint. I don’t in fact know very often what the paint will do, and it does many things which are very much better than I could make it do”. (Francis Bacon. 1909 – 1992) Francis_Bacon_(artist)

Study_after_Velazquez's_Portrait_of_Pope_Innocent_XStudy_for_the_Head_of_George_Dyer

Three_Studies_for_the_Portrait_of_Henrietta_Moraes

Photo portrait of Francis Bacon. Photographed in late 1980s. credit Wikipedia.com.

Study after Velazquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X. Francis Bacon. 1953. Oil on canvas. 60×46″ (152×117 cm).

Study for the head of George Dyer. Francis Bacon. 1967. Oil on canvas. 14×12″ (35.5×30.5 cm).

Three Studies for the Portrait of Henrietta Moraes. Francis Bacon. 1963. Oil on canvas. Triptych.

Sagacious Serendipity – Red

 

Redimg380

A working studio becomes layered with a deep and wondrous treasure trove of raw material. When I become a camera the possibilities of framing chance encounters with surreal and inspiring compositions are limitless. This series shares my captures of random juxtapositions that caught my eye. Some I may use as source ideas for painting, but all are complete in themselves as examples of sagacious serendipity.

The scraps of writing and doodles are taken from my version of a sketchbook which consists of bits of paper I scribble on as I moodle around the studio.

Click on images for more detail.