food for thought / Barbara Hepworth

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“My left hand is my thinking hand. The right is only a motor hand. This holds the hammer. The left hand, the thinking hand, must be relaxed, sensitive. The rhythms of thought pass through the fingers and grip of this hand into the stone. It is also a listening hand. It listens for basic weaknesses of flaws in the stone; for the possibility or imminence of fractures.”

Before I start carving the idea must be almost complete. I say ‘almost’ because the really important thing seems to be the sculptor’s ability to let her intuition guide her over the gap between conception and realization without compromising the integrity of the original idea; the point being that the material has vitality – it resists and makes demands….”

Dame Barbara Hepworth. 1903 – 1975.

Figure-hepworth

 

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 Credits to Google images and Wikipedia.

Figure for Landscape. Dame Barbara Hepworth. 1960.

Sphere with Inner Form. Dame Barbara Hepworth. 1963.

Spring. Dame Barbara Hepworth. 1966.

Artist’s Studio (preserved). St. Ives. Cornwall, England.

food for thought / Jackson Pollock

“When I’m painting, I’m not aware of what I’m doing. It’s only after a get acquainted period that I see what I’ve been about. I’ve no fears about making changes for the painting has a life of its own”.

August 1953:  Portrait of American Abstract Expressionist painter Jackson Pollock (1912 - 1956) at his studio in East Hampton, New York.   (Photo  CREDIT!!!!!!----Tony Vaccaro/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Jackson Pollock. 1912-1956

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Image property of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY.

Credits:

Video thanks to YouTube.

Photo thanks to Tony Vaccaro/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

1st painting: Number 5. by Jackson Pollock. 1948. 4×8′. Oil on fiberboard.

2nd. Number 1. by Jackson Pollock. 1949. 5’3″x8’6″. Enamel and aluminum paint on canvas.

3rd. Convergence. by Jackson Pollock. 1952. 93.5″x155″. Oil on canvas.

 

 

 

 

 

food for thought / Richard Diebenkorn

“… putting down what I felt in terms of some overall image at the moment today, and perhaps being terribly disappointed with it tomorrow… trying to make it better and then despairing and destroying partially or wholly… getting back into it and just kind of frantically trying to pull something into this rectangle that made sense to me…”

(Richard Diebenkorn. 1922-1993. American)

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Richard_Diebenkorn's_painting_'Ocean_Park_No.129'

 

Richard_Diebenkorn's_painting_'Ocean_Park_No._67'

 

Credits: All images thanks to Wikipedia.

Photo of Diebenkorn, 1986.

Cityscape 1. 1963. oil on canvas. 60×50″.

Ocean Park No.129. oil on canvas. 1984.

Ocean Park No.67. oil on canvas. 1973. 100×80″.

food for thought / francis bacon

“In my case all painting… is an accident. I foresee it and yet I hardly ever carry it out as I foresee it. It transforms itself by the actual paint. I don’t in fact know very often what the paint will do, and it does many things which are very much better than I could make it do”. (Francis Bacon. 1909 – 1992) Francis_Bacon_(artist)

Study_after_Velazquez's_Portrait_of_Pope_Innocent_XStudy_for_the_Head_of_George_Dyer

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Photo portrait of Francis Bacon. Photographed in late 1980s. credit Wikipedia.com.

Study after Velazquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X. Francis Bacon. 1953. Oil on canvas. 60×46″ (152×117 cm).

Study for the head of George Dyer. Francis Bacon. 1967. Oil on canvas. 14×12″ (35.5×30.5 cm).

Three Studies for the Portrait of Henrietta Moraes. Francis Bacon. 1963. Oil on canvas. Triptych.