food for thought / Jackson Pollock

“When I’m painting, I’m not aware of what I’m doing. It’s only after a get acquainted period that I see what I’ve been about. I’ve no fears about making changes for the painting has a life of its own”.

August 1953:  Portrait of American Abstract Expressionist painter Jackson Pollock (1912 - 1956) at his studio in East Hampton, New York.   (Photo  CREDIT!!!!!!----Tony Vaccaro/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Jackson Pollock. 1912-1956

number-5pollock_1_1949

Image property of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY.

Credits:

Video thanks to YouTube.

Photo thanks to Tony Vaccaro/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

1st painting: Number 5. by Jackson Pollock. 1948. 4×8′. Oil on fiberboard.

2nd. Number 1. by Jackson Pollock. 1949. 5’3″x8’6″. Enamel and aluminum paint on canvas.

3rd. Convergence. by Jackson Pollock. 1952. 93.5″x155″. Oil on canvas.

 

 

 

 

 

food for thought / Richard Diebenkorn

“… putting down what I felt in terms of some overall image at the moment today, and perhaps being terribly disappointed with it tomorrow… trying to make it better and then despairing and destroying partially or wholly… getting back into it and just kind of frantically trying to pull something into this rectangle that made sense to me…”

(Richard Diebenkorn. 1922-1993. American)

Richard_Diebenkorn

Cityscape_I_360

 

Richard_Diebenkorn's_painting_'Ocean_Park_No.129'

 

Richard_Diebenkorn's_painting_'Ocean_Park_No._67'

 

Credits: All images thanks to Wikipedia.

Photo of Diebenkorn, 1986.

Cityscape 1. 1963. oil on canvas. 60×50″.

Ocean Park No.129. oil on canvas. 1984.

Ocean Park No.67. oil on canvas. 1973. 100×80″.

food for thought / francis bacon

“In my case all painting… is an accident. I foresee it and yet I hardly ever carry it out as I foresee it. It transforms itself by the actual paint. I don’t in fact know very often what the paint will do, and it does many things which are very much better than I could make it do”. (Francis Bacon. 1909 – 1992) Francis_Bacon_(artist)

Study_after_Velazquez's_Portrait_of_Pope_Innocent_XStudy_for_the_Head_of_George_Dyer

Three_Studies_for_the_Portrait_of_Henrietta_Moraes

Photo portrait of Francis Bacon. Photographed in late 1980s. credit Wikipedia.com.

Study after Velazquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X. Francis Bacon. 1953. Oil on canvas. 60×46″ (152×117 cm).

Study for the head of George Dyer. Francis Bacon. 1967. Oil on canvas. 14×12″ (35.5×30.5 cm).

Three Studies for the Portrait of Henrietta Moraes. Francis Bacon. 1963. Oil on canvas. Triptych.

Mexico Redux -1

Rite of Spring. 22" x 30". acrylic on paper. (Ptg #19).
Rite of Spring. 22″ x 30″. acrylic on paper.

Although it has been an unbelievably mild winter in Vancouver, with new growth promising an early spring, I am still missing my annual visit to the heat of Mexico. Usually at this time I am either soaking in the roaring surf of Sayulita or painting in the sun drenched courtyards of historic San Miguel De Allende. Instead, I am rusting in the overcast chill of  a wet, north-west coast February.  So, for awhile, I am taking a virtual holiday by re-visiting some of my past Mexico posts, with a little tweaking and editing. I hope to share the southern sun with those of you who are deprived of such in this turn of seasons.

Patio SMA

Rite of Spring was created in San Miguel De Allende in this warm, sun dappled patio filled with sculptures, paintings, cats, street sounds, the coming and going of art students, nut sellers and the soulful music and song of central Mexico. I was inspired by images of the heat and colours of the Aztec sun god merged with the tree spirits of the dark northern forests of Canada dancing to the drums and singing of ancient Haida voices.

Awesome Blog Content (ABC) Award…

I was surprised, delighted and honoured to receive a nomination for this award from Kelly Graham, a mixed media artist blogging from New Zealand. Check out her colourful and whimsical Kiwi artworks –  http://kellygrahamartist.com   Thank you so much Kelly.

The ‘ABC Award’ asks the recipient to name 26 alphabetical things about themselves. Well – I explored past recipients and found that this requirement was, not surprisingly, sidestepped in favor of more creative interpretations.

My own approach is to use my blog name, art rat cafe, as the first letters of words that describe some aspects of who I am – so, here goes, but I warn you that unless you are a Scrabble or Crossword aficionado you may have to work for the meanings. As a modest reward I will list, with effusive praise, the blog addresses of all of you who send me the correct definitions of all of the words by June 30th, (what else do you have to do with your time?)…

Apterous, Rapscallion, TemerariousRaffish, Apotropaic, TardigradeConcupiscent, Anthropomorphous, Fervent, Effulgent.

There, now you all know me better…BUT WAIT, there is more. To play this forward I get to nominate 6 wonderful bloggers for this award. I love this because I can now mention some of my favorite blogs that I had to miss out for the Liebster Award. So, in no particular order:

http://seascapesaus.wordpress.com/       Amazing seascape paintings, art issues and life stories from Australia.

http://shepaintsred.wordpress.com/   Brilliant art, writings, photography, poetry, family and meditations on life and spirit.

http://patternsthatconnext.wordpress.com/   A different viewpoint on art, Andy Parkinson’s own work and exhibitions attended. Precise and philosophical meditations on the creative process. Abstract art and systems thinking.

http://moleculesofemotion.wordpress.com/   Contemporary art by Gregory. His own art and explorations of the psychology of the creative process.

http://barbaraelka.com/   Incredible black and white photography – moody and evocative.

http://starsrainsunmoon.com/    Mari Sanchez Cayuso – surreal poetry with beautiful images – will take you into other realms of reality.

Go see what these people have to offer – I know that you will connect to them as deeply as I do. Happy Solstice…

More Paintings from Mexico

All paintings: acrylic and oil on paper. 11″ x 15″