acts of art 19 -“Advice to the Young”

 

This is my final post in this series. I hope you have all found at least one viable idea or inspiration somewhere amongst the presentations.

I taught high school art for 25 years so I think I can claim to know something about “Advice to the Young”. Mostly I know that some things never change. As a teen and beyond I rejected ‘advice’ from any and all manifestations of authority. My students were the same. This is how it must be, to follow our own path, learning and understanding through experience, not advice. So why this video? On one level I would be surprised if any young, creative person was even aware of this video. I chose it because it works so well as the last in this series of exploring the creative process. I find it almost endearing how these 8 well established and famous artists respond to the question. It’s the most natural thing that we try to pass on what we think we have learned to our young.

When I was teaching I encouraged my graduating students to explore Life in all of its myriad, miraculous facets before committing to Art School / University and the stress and financial burden of ‘higher’ education. Because…Making Art is a reflection of our life, expressing and sharing who we are as humans and our dances with each other. For most this doesn’t come. like the blues, until the heartbreaks, frustrations and angst of our 20s and 30s. And yet, even in my dotage, there are more days than not that I feel ‘young’. Not the energy young of youth but the young of ‘beginner’s mind’ and the young of standing before the work of a maestro, a master of their art, on line or if you are blessed, a personal mentor.

Art is very capable of Magic, It seems I have known this forever. Some of our young will feel, hear and follow the call, most will not. It has always been so.

I had a few epiphanies along the way: Gratitude. Creative loneliness. Listening (I mean really listening)…and wondering who we all are out here in virtual space?

As mature, creative artists engaged in your particular passion ~ what is your own “advice to the young”?

And finally, if nothing else, it’s so worth the 8.5 minutes just to see Patti Smith again, her words, images and music evoking my own and wonderfully strange young.

So I just simply HAD TO share Because The Night… Patti with Bruce + U2…SWEET!

acts of art 18 ~ Ibrahim El-Salahi

 

 

Art Lives

Beneath our careful, clean and ordered lives

Art lives

In the unimaginable.

In prisons, hidden under dirt.

In refugee and homeless camps,

empty stomachs in the dark.

In the hospice and the hospital,

the asylum and sanatorium.

In the cold, the hunger and the endless pain

Art lives.

 

Poem by clinock.

acts of art 16 ~ Liz Magor

Studio Envy. I confess to it, and yet I have a perfectly viable creative space in my one bedroom condo. I can make most of what I like to make here in my living / working room, except the big things. And yet…

Over the years I’ve visited a lot of artist studios and haven’t needed a therapist to know why Studio Envy persists in my deepest caves, ready to rise like an H.P. Lovecraft entity whenever I enter another light filled, white walled, multi shelved, cathedral spaced studio.

It’s precisely because it’s not a ‘living room’, multi tasked studio. It’s simply there to serve as a working space. A rare and beautiful thing this huge volume of air and light, filled with art and the meditative focus of the artist. It can be felt as almost holy…

But let’s not forget it’s also real estate. Here in Vancouver, BC. J.Q. Public is considered blessed by the gods if he/she can find any decent living space at an affordable rent. And then, in addition, to be able to rent a studio!!! Almost inconceivable, unless you are very successful in your chosen field, or very rich.

folded message

Most art studio situations I know of in this city are shared by groups of artists, some of whom have recognized plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose, and have gone with it and called themselves ‘Collectives’ and have even published manifestos.

Liz Magor is a successful Canadian artist and I admire her in every way. She was a mentor at U. Vic. when I was working through a B.F.A. degree. It is impossible to think of masters like her operating without a studio. But what about the rest of us? Ms. Magor believes “Everyone Should Have a Studio”. I agree metaphorically, but realistically, a snowball’s chance in hell…

What do you think about art studios? Do they contribute to the separation of the visual artist from the public? Are they an ivory tower, elitist concept when so many millions are homeless or are they a needed and necessary space for making art?

Do you have a studio? Celebrate it with us on Art Rat Cafe – send pics and tell us how you came by it and what it means to you. Or, if you dream of having a studio of your own, tell us why.

magic-forest

Above two photos from my own workspace.

http://www.johnclinockart.com                 Portfolio Site

http://www.instagram.com/johnclinock/          Instagram

 

 

 

acts of art 15 ~ Elizabeth Gilbert

I am thinking Ms. Gilbert’s words apply to all art forms, whatever they may be, and to our own creative process, whatever form that may take.

I am drawn particularly to her idea of recognizing the unbalance of extremes, of centering by bringing our creative passion home.

 

 

http://www.johnclinockart.com                 Portfolio Site

http://www.instagram.com/johnclinock/          Instagram

acts of art 3 – Leonardo da Vinci

 

800px-Leonardo,_san_girolamo

“Look at walls splashed with a number of stains, or stones of various mixed colours. If you have to invent some scene, you can see there resemblances to a number of landscapes, adorned with mountains, rivers, rocks, trees, great plains, valleys and hills, in various ways. Also you can see various battles, and lively postures of strange figures, expressions on faces, costumes and an infinite number of things, which you can reduce to good integrated form. This happens on such walls and varicolored stones, (which act) like the sound of bells, in whose peeling you can find every name and word that you can imagine.

demos

vapor-god

Do not despise my opinion, when I remind you that it should not be hard for you to stop sometimes and look into the stains of walls, or the ashes of a fire, or clouds, or mud or like places, in which, if you consider them well, you may find really marvelous ideas. 

DSC05483

The mind of the painter is stimulated to new discoveries, the composition of battles of animals and men, various compositions of landscapes and monstrous things, such as devils and similar things, which may bring you honor, because by indistinct things the mind is stimulated to new inventions.”

Leonardo da Vinci

Vitruvian

Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519) was an Italian polymath, having been a scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, painter, sculptor, architect, botanist, musician and writer. Born as the illegitimate son of a notary, Piero da Vinci, and a peasant girl, Caterina, at Vinci in the region of Florence, Leonardo was educated in the studio of the renowned Florentine painter, Verrocchio. Much of his earlier working life was spent in the service of Ludovico il Moro in Milan. He later worked in Rome, Bologna and Venice, spending his final years in France at the home given to him by King Francois I.

Leonardo-da-Vinci-Self-portrait-in-red-chalk-circa-1512-to-1515-Italian-Renaissance-artwork-artist-Royal-Library-of-Turin

Leonardo has often been described as the archetype of the "Renaissance man", a man whose seemingly infinite curiosity was equaled only by his powers of invention. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest painters of all time and perhaps the most diversely talented person ever to have lived.

credits:

image 1. Unfinished painting by Leonardo da Vinci. Saint Jerome in the Wilderness. 1480.

image 2. Wall in Vancouver, BC. Canada. Photo by Clinock.

image 3. Clouds over Vancouver. Photo by Clinock.

image 4. Detail of sidewalk in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. Photo by Clinock.

image 5. Vitruvian Man by Leonardo da Vinci. c. 1490.

image 6. Self Portrait in Red Chalk by Leonardo da Vinci. c. 1512.

Thanks to Wikipedia for images and text.